Today in History

Today is Friday, Nov. 11, the 315th day of 2022. There are 50 days left in the year. Today is Veterans Day.

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French President Emmanuel Macron will head to Louisiana on the last day of his visit to the U.S. Macron's office said the visit is being held to celebrate longstanding cultural ties and to discuss energy policy. Macron will meet Gov. John Bel Edwards on Friday. Macron is also scheduled to see the historic French Quarter, the heart of the city and meet with Mayor LaToya Cantrell. The Advocate reported that the visit will be the first by a French president since Valery Giscard d’Estaing traveled to Lafayette and New Orleans in 1976. The only other French president to visit Louisiana was Charles de Gaulle in 1960.

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An influential Iraqi cleric who announced his withdrawal from politics four months ago has broken a period of relative silence to launch an anti-LGBTQ campaign. Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr posted a statement on Twitter Wednesday calling for “believing men and women [to] unite all over the world to combat (the LGBTQ community).”  After Friday afternoon prayers, al-Sadr’s followers lined up outside of mosques around the country to sign a pledge to “stand against (homosexuality) or (LGBTQ) by ethical, peaceful and religious means." Despite the campaign’s nominal commitment to non-violence, LGBTQ people fear that it will lead to more harassment and abuse in a country where their identity already puts them in danger.

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Chip Ganassi Racing has signed New Zealand driver Marcus Armstrong to join its IndyCar lineup next season. Armstrong spent the last three seasons in Formula One feeder series F2 and will drive the No. 11 for Ganassi. The No. 11 is the No. 48 that Jimmie Johnson drove the last two seasons but Chip Ganassi is changing it to run the sequential numbers 8, 9, 10 and 11 in IndyCar. Armstrong in this move will be teammates with six-time IndyCar champion Scott Dixon. That was his childhood hero. He's a former Ferrari development driver and was once teammates with Christian Lundgaard and roommates with Callum Illot.

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An Oscar-winning documentary filmmaker behind “American Factory” whose films explored themes of race, class and gender, Julia Reicher has died at 76. Her family said through a representative that she died Thursday night in Ohio from cancer. Often called the “godmother of American independent documentaries,” Reichart told the stories of ordinary Americans, from autoworkers dealing with plant closures and foreign investors, to communists and female labor activists in the 1930s. In her 50 years of filmmaking, Reichert won two Primetime Emmy Awards and was nominated for four Oscars, winning one.

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Talk about women talking. After making fly-on-the-wall documentaries for 60 years, Boston-born filmmaker Frederick Wiseman, 92, has made a second narrative film. The first was the 2002 effort “La derniere lettre.” Like its predecessor, “A Couple” is a one-woman show, in this case featuring F…

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The U.N.'s high commissioner for human rights says Myanmar’s military-installed government has sentenced more critics to death, bringing the total to 139, and is using capital punishment as a tool to crush opposition. High Commissioner Volker Türk says at least seven university students were sentenced to death behind closed doors on Wednesday and there are reports that as many as four more youth activists were sentenced on Thursday. The military seized power in February last year, ousting the elected government of Aung San Suu Kyi. The army’s action was met with widespread peaceful protests that were quashed with lethal force. The government hanged four political activists in July, in the country’s first executions in at least three decades.

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Carolina Panthers owner David Tepper and his real estate company are being scrutinized in a criminal investigation. The probe is examining whether they misused any public money in their failed effort to build a new practice facility for the NFL team. The York County Sheriff’s Office says state agents and local prosecutors are involved in the probe, which does not mean any crime occured. Tepper’s company GT Real Estate is denying any criminal wrongdoing. It suggests the probe could be timed to disrupt a settlement the team reached agreeing to repay York County more than $21 million, roughly what it took in sales tax revenue to build access roads.

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Cameron Crowe believes the spirit of a place lingers long after the moment has passed. That’s what makes recording the Broadway “Almost Famous” cast album at New York’s iconic Power Station studio so special for him. Some of the most prominent rock and pop albums were recorded at the legendary studio, including Bruce Springsteen’s “The River,” David Bowie’s “Scary Monsters” and “Tattoo You” by The Rolling Stones. More than another project, “Almost Famous” was a deeply personal coming-of-age-story for Crowe when he wrote and directed the 2000 film, loosely based on his experiences as a teenage music journalist. Now it's a Broadway show and an upcoming album.

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The U.S. and Ukrainian chapters of the international writers’ organization PEN have claimed that Russian troops in Ukraine are deliberately attacking the country’s museums, libraries and other cultural institutions. They said in a report issued on Friday that “culture is not collateral damage in the war against Ukraine; it’s a target, a central pillar of Russian President Vladimir Putin’s justification for the war.” PEN cited Ukraine’s Ministry of Culture as saying that 529 “cultural heritage and cultural institutions” have been destroyed or damaged since the war started on Feb. 24. PEN Ukraine said it has documented 31 civilian writers, artists and other cultural workers killed in Russian attacks this year

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Turkey’s foreign minister says the United States and Russia have failed to meet promises to clear Syria’s border with Turkey from Kurdish militants, forcing Ankara to intervene. Mevlut Cavusoglu also said Friday that Turkey was seeking reconciliation with Syria’s government to facilitate the return of refugees, cooperate in fighting extremists and end the conflict in Syria. Cavusoglu’s comments came after Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan vowed last month to launch a new land invasion of northern Syria to target militant Kurdish groups, following a Nov. 13 explosion in Istanbul that killed six people. The Turkish military has launched a barrage of airstrikes on suspected militant targets in northern Syria and Iraq in retaliation.

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PITTSBURGH, Dec. 2, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- "I was in physical therapy during the pandemic and noticed that the therapist spent a lot of time walking around looking and locating wipes to clean every object I worked with," said an inventor from Boone, N.C., "so I invented the FANITIZER"

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On Friday afternoon more than 2,000 experts will wrap up a week of negotiations on plastic pollution at one of the largest global gatherings ever to address what even industry leaders in plastics say is a crisis. It was the first meeting of a United Nations committee on plastics set up in March to draft what is intended to be a landmark treaty to bring an end to plastic pollution globally. The United Nations Environment Programme held the first meeting of the Intergovernmental Negotiating Committee in Punta del Este, Uruguay Monday to Friday. Even in this first meetings of five set to take place over the next two years, factions came into focus as some countries want top-down global mandates, and the chemical industry wants country-by-country rules.

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DALLAS — The regional governing bodies of the United Methodist Church are called annual conferences. They typically meet once a year to conduct church business. But two of those Texas conferences will meet this weekend in special sessions to approve the withdrawal of potentially hundreds of …

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Authorities say a U.S. woman was killed and four other passengers injured when a massive wave struck the Viking Polaris cruise ship while it was sailing toward the port of Ushuaia in southern Argentina on an Antarctic cruise. The Argentine Naval Prefecture said the 62-year-old woman was killed by broken glass when the wave broke cabin windows late Tuesday during a storm. The ship suffered limited damage and arrived in Ushuaia the next day. Authorities did not identify the woman or her hometown. Viking called it a “rogue wave incident” and said the four other passengers’ injuries were non-life threatening.

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I must admit that as much as I love the classic recordings of country music king and queen George Jones and Tammy Wynette — a whole damn lot — my first thought on learning that they would be the subjects of a double biopic was to wonder whether its creator would be hip enough to include "Jus…

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Ockie Strydom has set a new course record with a 9-under 63 that's moved him within two shots of clubhouse leader Thriston Lawrence at the South African Open. Second-round play was suspended overnight because of lightning. Strydom recorded nine birdies at the Blair Atholl Golf and Equestrian Estate to close in on his South African countryman. Lawrence shot a second-round 67 that left him at 13-under 131 overall. Lawrence's 64 on Thursday matched the course record he set the year before. South African amateur Christian Maas and Frenchman Clément Sordet are three shots back in a third-place tie. The 19-year-old Maas had eight birdies and a bogey in his 65.

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A key electrical power plant in a Moscow-backed breakaway region of Moldova will not resume energy supplies to the rest of the country after officials failed to reach any agreements on Friday amid an acute energy crisis, authorities said. The meetings held Friday between Moldovan officials and de-facto authorities from Transnistria took place in Moldova’s capital, Chisinau, and focussed on a range of bilateral issues raising hopes of easing a severe energy crisis for Moldova, Europe’s poorest country.  But the talks did not yield any solutions including resuming electricity supplies, Vitaly Ignatyev, the unrecognized government’s foreign minister, told reporters.

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About 8,000 American troops watch over the airspace of the Middle East from a major air base run by Qatar as World Cup fans throng stadiums in the energy-rich nation. Al-Udeid Air Base was built on a flat stretch of desert about 20 miles (30 kilometers) southwest of Qatari capital Doha. The base once was considered so sensitive that American military officers identified it as only being somewhere “in southwest Asia.” The sprawling hub is now Qatar’s strategic gem. It showcases the Gulf Arab emirate’s tight security partnership with the United States,. Washington considers Doha a major non-NATO ally.

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Eight years into a U.S. program to control damage from feral pigs, the invasive animals are still a multibillion-dollar plague on farmers, wildlife and the environment. They've been wiped out in 11 of the 41 states where they were reported in 2014 or 2015. And there are fewer in parts of the other 30. But in spite of more than $100 million in federal money, officials estimate there are still 6 million to 9 million hogs gone wild nationwide and in three U.S. territories, doing at least $2.5 billion a year in U.S. damages. Estimates in 2014 were 5 million hogs and $1.5 billion in damages. Experts say the bigger figures are due to better estimates, not increases.

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New Mexico health officials are mandating hospitals revert to a “hub-and-spoke” model to ensure patients get the care they need amid an alarming rise in respiratory infections among children. The New Mexico Department of Health announced the public health emergency order Thursday as hospitals continue to be stretched thin by pediatric cases of respiratory syncytial virus, known as RSV. It calls for hospitals to work cooperatively to manage their resources and transport patients to where they can get the most appropriate level of care. Officials say hospitals and emergency rooms in New Mexico are running above their licensed capacity that is unsustainable. There was a surge in cases in October and November.

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Ohio House lawmakers have advanced a proposal meant to ensure that gun owners’ lawfully held firearms and ammunition aren’t seized by the government during natural disasters, public health crises or other declared emergencies. The bill cleared the Republican-led House on Thursday. During such emergencies, it would deem certain firearms businesses “essential,” temporarily extend concealed carry licenses that would otherwise expire and keep government entities from stopping lawful hunting or fishing practices. The bill's Republican sponsor has said it doesn't add new gun rights but clarifies that owners “cannot have their rights taken away.” Opponents say the measure would hinder local governments from protecting their residents.

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Social media users shared a range of false claims this week. Here are the facts: Arizona election equipment was certified before it was used in the midterms. An Arizona county did not ‘lose’ nearly 300,000 votes in the midterm election. A photo does not show a Balenciaga designer wearing a devil-like outfit. U.K. 2021 census data doesn't show that three of the country's largest cities have all become “minority white.” And a photo of beer disguised as Pepsi was taken at a border checkpoint in Saudi Arabia in 2015, not at the current World Cup in Qatar.

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A court in Tanzania has sentenced 11 people to death for the murder of a conservationist there. Anti-poaching activist Wayne Lotter was shot dead in August 2017 while riding in a taxi in Tanzania’s commercial capital of Dar es Salaam. Those sentenced to death include two citizens of neighboring Burundi. Tanzania hasn’t carried out an execution in decades. Lotter was a South African national and the director and co-founder of the PALMS Foundation. The non-governmental organization said he had helped to train thousands of game scouts and developed an “intelligence-based approach” to anti-poaching that had success in countering wildlife trafficking.

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Prosecutors have resumed their closing argument in the Trump Organization’s criminal tax fraud trial, promising to share previously unrevealed details about Donald Trump’s knowledge of a tax dodge scheme hatched by one of his top executives. Assistant Manhattan District Attorney Joshua Steinglass continued his summary of the case on Friday after telling jurors Thursday that “Donald Trump knew exactly what was going on with his top executives." The tax fraud case is the only trial to arise from the three-year investigation of Trump and his business practices by the Manhattan district attorney’s office. The company has denied wrongdoing, with its lawyers arguing Weisselberg was only out to benefit himself. Trump himself is not on trial.

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An urgent meeting of South Africa’s ruling party to discuss the future of President Cyril Ramaphosa has been delayed as calls continue for his resignation over a scandal over money stolen from his farm. The African National Congress’ national executive committee on Friday had been expected to discuss a parliamentary report which suggests Ramaphosa may have violated anti-corruption laws related to the theft of millions of dollars from his Phala Phala farm in 2020. The committee has the power to force the president to resign and has done so in the past. A party leader says the meeting will reconvene before a parliamentary debate Tuesday.

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The rudeness pandemic, the actual pandemic and all things gray. There’s a lot to leave behind when 2022 comes to a close as uncertainty rules around the world. The health crisis brought on the dawn of slow living, but it crushed many families forced to hustle for their lives. Karens went on the rise. Crypto currencies tanked. Pete Davidson’s love thing with Kim Kardashian made headlines. Among other things on the AP's annual Over It list are ASMR and gratuitous grossness on the big screen.

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A top official at the World Health Organization said the U.N. agency was “pleased” to see China loosening some of its coronavirus restrictions, saying “it’s really important that governments listen to their people when the people are in pain.” At a press briefing on Friday, WHO emergencies director Dr. Michael Ryan said the organization was glad to see China “adjusting their current strategies” in recalibrating their response to COVID-19. Ryan said using imported  vaccines, like those made by BioNTech-Pfizer and Moderna, would be a “solid option” for China to boost its immunization coverage. China’s home-grown vaccines have proven to be less effective.