AP

Russian forces are pounding the city of Lysychansk and its surroundings in an all-out attempt to seize the last stronghold of resistance in eastern Ukraine’s Luhansk province. The regional governor said Saturday that Russians "opened fire from all available kinds of weapons” in the last day. Ukrainian fighters have spent weeks trying to defend the city and to keep it from falling to Russia, as neighboring Sievierodonetsk did a week ago. Luhansk and neighboring Donetsk are the two provinces that make up the Donbas region, where Russia has focused its offensive since the spring. Pro-Russia separatists have held portions of both provinces since 2014, and Moscow recognizes all of Luhansk and Donetsk as sovereign republics.

AP

Fresh rain and falling boulders are hampering rescuers who have pulled out 26 bodies from the debris of a mudslide that wiped out a railroad construction site in India’s northeast. Officials say there is little hope of finding survivors among 37 people still missing since Wednesday night. A rescuer official said on Saturday that 13 soldiers and five civilians have been rescued from the debris so far. Twenty-one of the confirmed 26 dead were members of the Territorial Army who were providing security for railway officials from insurgents in the area. An estimated 200 people have been killed in heavy downpours and mudslides in India's northeastern states, while 42 people have died in Bangladesh since May 17.

AP

South Africans are struggling in the dark to cope with increased power cuts that have hit households and businesses across the country. The rolling power cuts have been experienced for years but this week the country’s state-owned power utility Eskom extended them so that some residents and businesses have gone without power for more than 9 hours a day. A strike by Eskom workers added to the utility’s woes which experts say include breakdowns of its aging coal-fired power plants, insufficient generation capacity and corruption.The prolonged power cuts are hitting South Africans in the winter months of the Southern Hemisphere when many households rely on electricity for heat, light and cooking.

AP

Syrian state media says Israel has carried out an airstrike on a coastal Syrian village near the border with Lebanon wounding two people. The Saturday morning attack is the first since a June 10 Israeli airstrike on the international airport in the Syrian capital of Damascus caused significant damage to infrastructure and runways and rendered the main runway unusable. The airport was closed for two weeks and flights resumed on June 23. Israel has staged hundreds of strikes against targets in Syria over the years but rarely acknowledges or discusses such operations.

AP

A Virgin Orbit rocket carrying U.S. Defense Department satellites has been launched from a special Boeing 747 flying off the Southern California coast. The modified jumbo jet took off Friday night from Mojave Air and Space Port in the Mojave Desert and released the rocket over the Pacific Ocean northwest of Los Angeles. The launch was procured by the U.S. Space Force for a Defense Department test program. The seven payloads will conduct various experiments. It was Virgin Orbit’s first night launch.

AP

The Texas Supreme Court has blocked a lower court order that had given some abortion clinics confidence to resume performing abortions. The order handed down Friday night by the state’s highest court comes just days after some abortion providers rushed to resume services. An lower court order issued this week by a Houston judge had reassured some doctors they could temporarily resume abortions up to six weeks into pregnancy. Before that, doctors across Texas had stopped performing abortions in the state after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade and ended the constitutional right to abortion.

AP

Tropical Storm Bonnie has swept into Nicaragua bringing the threat of flooding from heavy rain, while heading for a predicted fast crossing on the way to the Pacific and a possible strengthening into a hurricane. Bonnie came ashore late Friday on Nicaragua’s Carribean coast about 75 miles (120 kilometers) south of Bluefields. Forecasters warn of the danger of significant flooding, with rains of up to 8 inches, and even more in isolated places. The storm is predicted to also cross over a part of Costa Rica during the night before moving out into the Pacific on Saturday. It is then forecast to gain power and possibily reach hurricane by Monday.

AP

Five people have been killed and 44 others injured in a magnitude 6.3 earthquake in southern Iran. State television said rescue teams were deployed near the epicenter, Sayeh Khosh village, which is home to around 300 people in Hormozgan province, some 620 miles south of the capital, Tehran. People went into the streets as aftershocks continued to jolt the area after the early Saturday morning quake, which also damaged buildings and infrastructure. Iran lies on major seismic faults and experiences one earthquake a day on average. In 2003, a magnitude 6.6 earthquake flattened the historic city of Bam, killing 26,000 people. A magnitude 7 earthquake that struck western Iran in 2017 killed more than 600 people and injured more than 9,000.

AP

LOS ANGELES — Los Angeles County officially finalized the list of candidates who will go head to head in the Nov. 8 runoff election, setting the stage for nearly a dozen bruising contests, including the mayoral showdown between U.S. Rep. Karen Bass and real estate developer Rick Caruso.

AP

The ex-boyfriend of a New York City woman shot dead Wednesday as she pushed their infant daughter in a stroller has been arrested and charged with killing her. Police said 22-year-old Isaac Argro was arrested Friday. Slain mother Azsia Johnson’s family identified Argro as the baby’s father and said he routinely abused Johnson, beating her during her pregnancy and threatening to kill her. Argro is charged with murder and criminal possession of a weapon, police Commissioner Keechant Sewell said. Information on a lawyer who could speak on his behalf was not immediately available. Johnson was 20. Her 3-month-old daughter was not hurt, but was taken to a hospital for medical evaluation.

AP

The Biden administration is proposing up to 10 oil and gas lease sales in the Gulf of Mexico and one in Alaska over the next five years. Friday’s announcement goes against the Democratic administration’s promises to end new drilling on public lands and waters. But it scales back a Trump-era plan that called for dozens of offshore sales, including in undeveloped areas. Interior Department officials said fewer lease sales — or even no lease sales — could occur. A final decision is months away. Interior had suspended oil and gas lease sales in 2021 because of climate concerns but was forced to resume them by a federal judge in Louisiana.

AP

The sheriff of Pierce County, Washington, was ordered to post $100,000 bail while he awaits trial on false-reporting charges related to his controversial confrontation last year with a Black newspaper carrier. The Seattle Times reports that Judge Jeffrey Jahns on Friday imposed the bail — 10 times the amount requested by prosecutors — during a  hearing in Pierce County District Court in Tacoma, revoking Sheriff Ed Troyer’s earlier release on personal recognizance. Troyer faces criminal gross misdemeanor charges of false reporting and making a false or misleading statement to a public servant over his Jan. 27, 2021, confrontation with Altheimer, who was delivering newspapers on his regular route.

AP

Authorities say a group of people who were spotted getting in and out of a parked semitrailer in San Antonio were part of a work crew, not a human-smuggling operation. Authorities checked the vehicle Friday after someone alerted a deputy constable to it, just days after 53 migrants died when they were abandoned in a stifling semitrailer in San Antonio. Bexar County Sheriff Javier Salazar says everyone in the area is “a little more hypervigilant than usual." Salazar said authorities were still conducting interviews. But so far it appears the 12 Cubans and two Nicaraguans were in the U.S. legally, but might not have permission to work.

AP

Renewed efforts are underway to publicly investigate and possibly discipline two New Mexico attorneys that represented the Donald Trump campaign and helped challenge local results of the 2020 presidential election in the weeks prior to the Jan. 6, 2021, insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. A group of attorneys including former Albuquerque Mayor Martin Chavez on Thursday asked the state Supreme Court to intervene and ensure an investigation in public view into possible violations of professional standards. The state’s chief disciplinary counsel has twice declined requests for a public investigation. Now-President Joe Biden won the 2020 vote in New Mexico by about 11 percentage points.

AP

Some Hawaii residents, including Native Hawaiians and military families, say an investigation blaming a water contamination crisis on shoddy management and human error doesn’t help restore their trust in the U.S. Navy. Navy spouse Lauren Wright says her family continues avoiding water in their military home because she doesn't trust that it's safe. The leak poisoned thousands of people and forced military families to evacuate their homes for hotels. A Navy investigation released Thursday blamed the water crisis on shoddy management and human error.  The report listed a cascading series of mistakes from May through November 2021 when fuel got into a drinking water well.

AP

A Manhattan woman has been awarded over $400,000 by a jury after suing New York City and its police department, saying she suffered a traumatic brain injury when she was thrown to the ground while serving as a medic for protesters during 2012 Occupy Wall Street events. The Friday federal court verdict favored Mary Tardif. She sued in 2013, saying her epileptic condition was ignored after she suffered violent abuses from police officers who arrested her. She said they kicked her, walked on her limbs and tossed her to the ground. A city Law Department spokesperson said the city was disappointed with the verdict.

AP

County election officials wrapped up a two-day statewide recount of ballots in the Nevada GOP primary for governor on Friday and the outcome did not appear to change, showing second-place finisher Joey Gilbert losing to Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo in a crowded field. Gilbert has said he did not expect the results to change much but sought the recount to challenge the results of the election in court. He paid more than $910,000 for the recount, which took clerks in all 17 counties two days to perform. The state's two largest counties, Clark and Washoe, confirmed that Lombardo had beaten Gilbert.

AP

American Airlines, the biggest flier from Miami International Airport, asked the U.S. Department of Transportation this week for clearance to resume flights to five destinations in Cuba, outside Havana where it already flies six daily flights from here.

AP

California Gov. Gavin Newsom has pardoned a former inmate who received a life sentence when she was a teenager for killing her former pimp. It’s the final step in an official redemption that has spanned more than a decade and three governors of both political parties. Hers was among nearly three dozen such pardons and clemencies Friday that also affected younger and older offenders. Sara Kruzan was 16 when she killed George Gilbert Howard in a Riverside motel room. Kruzan eventually earned support from state lawmakers and reform groups seeking to soften harsh life sentences for those who committed their crimes as juveniles.

AP

The elected county recorder and the elections director in Arizona's Yavapai County are resigning after more than a year and a half of threats and heated criticism from backers of former President Donald Trump. Republican County Recorder Leslie Hoffman said Friday that she is fed up with the “nastiness” and has accepted a job outside the county. She says longtime the county's elections director is leaving for the same reason. She said she tired of the unfounded criticism of her and her department who have been recognized for years for running safe and secure elections. She said she's tired of the “nastiness."

AP

White House touts abortion pill as answer to Roe reversal but FDA rules limit use

AP

Alphabet Inc.’s Google said it will automatically delete records of user visits to sensitive locations, including abortion clinics, responding to growing concerns that the data could be used to prosecute those seeking reproductive care and other personal services.

AP

A jury in Miami has found a former Argentine naval officer responsible for a 1972 massacre of political prisoners in his homeland. It ordered him to pay more than $20 million in damages to relatives of four of the victims. The verdict came Friday against 79-year-old Roberto Guillermo Bravo, who has lived in the United States since 1973. The families filed the civil case against Bravo under a U.S. law that allows judicial action against residents of the United States for acts allegedly committed elsewhere. Bravo and other officers allegedly shot to death 16 unarmed political prisoners and seriously wounded three others at the Trelew military base in Patagonia on Aug. 22, 1972. He contends the deaths occurred during a shootout started by the prisoners as they tried to escape.

AP

Authorities in Mexico's Gulf coast Hustaeca region say the bound bodies of four people have been found in the burned-out wreckage of a helicopter, along with signs indicating they were killed by a drug gang. The killings Friday were the second act of grisly violence in a month in the region, once popular among tourists. Prosecutors in the northern state of San Luis Potosi say the private helicopter was normally used to transport tourists. They say the craft does not appear to have crashed, but rather may have been intentionally set afire. In early June, authorities in San Luis Potosi found the bodies of seven men dumped on a road in a nearby part of the Huasteca region.

AP

Prosecutors say they won’t move forward with a lawsuit against Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton over his refusal to release his communications relating to his appearance at a pro-Donald Trump rally that preceded the deadly riot at the U.S. Capitol last year. The Dallas Morning News and the Houston Chronicle report that the Austin-based Travis County district attorney’s office said in a letter Friday that it wouldn’t sue because journalists who had requested Paxton’s records didn’t want to testify in court because they might have to reveal their sources.

AP

Donald Trump’s social media company and some of its employees received subpoenas from a federal grand jury in New York and securities regulators. That is according to a public disclosure Friday by a company planning to buy Trump Media & Technology Group. The two probes could delay or even kill the planned purchase, a deal that promises a cash infusion of more than $1 billion that Trump Media needs to take on Twitter. Donald Trump, who is Trump Media’s chairman, was not among the employees who received subpoenas, according to a Trump Media statement.

AP

Prosecutors are signaling that they want to pursue the same charges against former Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder and eight others in the Flint crisis over lead-contaminated water. The move comes just a few days after the state Supreme Court said indictments must be dismissed. The attorney general’s office responded by asking two Flint-area judges who have been overseeing the cases to simply turn the indictments into common criminal complaints and let the charges proceed. Nine people were charged with crimes in 2021, including Snyder. The state Supreme Court said a one-judge grand jury had no power under Michigan law to return indictments.

AP

A Southern California man who once competed on the Philippines national decathlon team has agreed to plead guilty to bilking investors out of more than $28 million with a phony scheme to market cannabis vape pens. Federal prosecutors announced Friday that David Bunevacz of Calabasas will plead guilty to securities and wire fraud. Prosecutors say Bunevacz created several businesses that he claimed were involved in the cannabis industry and the sale of vape pens but used most of the money he raised on a lavish lifestyle. Bunevacz is a former University of California, Los Angeles, decathlete and competed for the Philippines in the 1990s.

AP

California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a new state law ending arrests for loitering for prostitution. The issue divided sex workers and advocates during a rare nine-month delay since state lawmakers passed the bill last year. Newsom noted Friday that the bill does not legalize prostitution. It revokes provisions that he says have led to disproportionate harassment of women and transgender adults. The measure also will allow those who were previously convicted to ask a court to seal the record of conviction. Some law enforcement groups say the repeal will make it harder both to confront those who commit crimes related to prostitution and human trafficking and to help those being victimized.

AP

California Gov. Gavin Newsom on Thursday signed a controversial bill to repeal a provision of state law that bans loitering for the intent to sell sex — a proposal that deeply divided Democrats in the Legislature and pitted transgender rights activists against advocates to stop human trafficking.

AP

Air France-KLM has agreed to pay $3.9 million to settle charges that it falsified records about international deliveries of U.S. mail. The Justice Department said Friday that the European airline incorrectly reported when and where mail shipments arrived to avoid penalties for deliveries that were late or went to the wrong location. Delta Air Lines reached a similar settlement this week, and American and United settled similar accusations.

AP

Cybersecurity experts say the California Department of Justice apparently failed to follow basic security procedures on its website. That lapse exposed the personal information of potentially hundreds of thousands of gun owners. The website was designed to only show general data about the number and location of concealed carry gun permits. But for about 24 hours starting Monday a spreadsheet with names and personal information was just a few clicks away, ready for review or downloading. Experts say there should have been controls to make sure the information stayed out of the reach of unwanted parties. The sensitive data should have been encrypted.

AP

At least two Republicans lawmakers will be required to testify before the Fulton County special grand jury investigating former President Donald Trump and Georgia’s 2020 elections, a superior court judge indicated Friday.

AP

Authorities say a teenage girl was seriously injured when a shark attacked her off Florida’s Gulf Coast. The Taylor County Sheriff's Office says the attack occurred Thursday afternoon off Keaton Beach. The 17-year-old girl's family says a 9-foot shark wrapped its jaws around the girl’s thigh. The girl poked the shark in the eyes and punched it before her brother managed to fight it off and pull the girl onto a stranger’s boat. The brother put a tourniquet on the girl's leg to slow blood loss before she was airlifted to a hospital in Tallahassee, Florida's capital city.

AP

FBI agents looking into events surrounding former President Donald Trump’s efforts to overturn his 2020 election loss have subpoenaed Arizona Senate President Karen Fann. The Prescott Republican orchestrated a discredited review of the election and she says she and a second Republican senator who has aggressively promoted the lie that Trump lost because of fraud were subpoenaed last week. Fann said Friday the subpoena seeks emails and text messages she has sent or received to more than a dozen people and she believes she's already released all of them under public records requests. The Department of Justice has been seeking information from people involved in Trump's efforts to discredit the 2020 election results or the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the U.S. Capitol.

AP

Mississippi is on track to block access to abortion pills by Thursday without the intervention of a federal court, according to attorneys trying to keep alive a generic mifepristone manufacturer’s legal battle against a state health official.

AP

Federal prosecutors say a former north Louisiana police officer pleaded guilty Friday to kicking a man in the face as he lay on the ground with his hands behind his back during an arrest in 2020. U.S. Attorney Brandon Brown's office, in a news release, said 44-year-old Jared Desadier, of Monroe, entered the plea before U.S. District Judge Elizabeth Foote to a charge of deprivation of rights under color of law. At the time of the incident, Desadier was an officer with the Monroe Police Department. Desadier admitted that the assault was without justification. He faces up to 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine. Sentencing is set for Nov. 21.

AP

The daughter of a Mexican reporter slain earlier this week in the northern Mexico border state of Tamaulipas has died of wounds suffered in the attack that killed her father. Antonio de la Cruz became the 12th journalist killed so far this year in Mexico, when a man on a motorcycle fired at him in his car outside his home. His 23-year-old daughter Cinthya de la Cruz Martínez was with him in the vehicle and was also shot. On Friday, the newspaper De la Cruz worked for, Expreso, reported that the daughter had died of her injuries at a hospital in Ciudad Victoria, where the attack occurred.

AP

The U.N. General Assembly’s first high-level meeting on road safety is calling for global action to cut the annual toll of nearly 1.3 million deaths and estimated 50 million injuries by at least half by decade's end. The political declaration adopted Friday by consensus says traffic deaths and injuries not only lead to widespread suffering but cost countries an average of 3% to 5% of their annual gross domestic product. The delegates urged all countries to commit to scaling up efforts and setting national targets to reduce fatalities and serious injuries.

AP

Proponents say a new law taking effect this fall will establish uniform rules for carrying knives across Ohio to prevent municipalities from enforcing local regulations. The bill’s main sponsor, Republican Sen. Kristina Roegner, said Friday that varying regulations create a confusing patchwork of laws that are tough to follow and enforce. Her legislation restricts local regulations on knife-carrying, but doesn’t change the types of knives the state allows people to carry. Democrats have questioned the need for the mostly Republican-backed bill. Republican Gov. Mike DeWine signed the bill in June. It takes effect in mid-September.

AP

North Carolina's Democratic attorney general has not yet indicated whether he will ask a court to lift the injunction on a state law banning abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy. Attorney General Josh Stein told Republican lawmakers on Friday that his department’s attorneys are reviewing the litigation that led a federal court to strike down the 20-week ban. His letter responds to GOP demands that he take immediate action in the wake of last week's U.S. Supreme Court ruling that overturned abortion protections. Senate leader Phil Berger and House Speaker Tim Moore warned last week Stein's inaction would lead them to get involved.

AP

A Texas inmate who is set to be put to death in less than two weeks has asked that his execution be delayed so he can donate a kidney. Ramiro Gonzales is set to receive a lethal injection on July 13 for fatally shooting 18-year-old Bridget Townsend, whose remains were found nearly two years after she vanished in 2001. In a letter Wednesday, Gonzales’ lawyers asked Republican Gov. Greg Abbott to grant a 30-day reprieve. The Death Penalty Information Center says such requests for death row inmates to make organ donations are rare.

AP

For three days, authorities combed the turquoise waters north of Puerto Rico searching for 23-year-old Harold Carrión, who was reported missing earlier this week and feared drowned at a popular beach. The U.S. Coast Guard said it scoured an area half the size of the U.S. territory as Puerto Rico police officers, scuba divers, emergency management officials and others helped in a search that cost more than $1.2 million. But Carrión turned up alive Friday after police received an anonymous tip and said they found him hiding in an abandoned structure in the north coastal town of Arecibo. Police have detained Carrión, but it isn't clear if he has been charged with anything. He was supposed to have appeared in court this week on unrelated charges.

AP

Protesters in the Libyan city of Tobruk have broken into the eastern Libya-based parliament and set fire to parts of it amid protests over months of failed efforts to set the divided country on a path toward elections. Protests demanding elections also were held in other Libyan cities Friday. After more than a decade of war, the country is split between competing administrations, one in the east and one in the west. The unrest comes a day after representatives of Libya’s rival powers failed at U.N.-mediated talks in Geneva to reach agreement on a constitutional framework for national elections.

AP

The first lawsuits have been filed following an Amtrak train collision and derailment in rural Missouri that killed four people and injured up to 150 others. Surviving passenger Janet Williams of Dubuque, Iowa, filed a federal lawsuit Friday naming Amtrak, BNSF Railway and MS Contracting, the employer of the dump truck driver who died when his vehicle was struck. The complaint alleges negligent design of the railroad crossing, and says the train was packed with too many riders. The Kansas City Star reports that Amtrak and BNSF sued MS Contracting Thursday, saying the train was “clearly visible.” Truck driver Billy Barton II died in the collision, along with three passengers. Barton's widow sued Chariton County and a BNSF official on Thursday.

AP

Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador's office says the new Gulf coast refinery is “a dream come true” for the country. On Friday, López Obrador “inaugurated” the partially finished Olmeca refinery in Dos Bocas, which is a city in his home state of Tabasco. The project, when finished, is expected to cost as much as $12 billion, well above original estimates of $9 billion. In 2021, Mexico agreed to buy Shell’s 50% share in the jointly owned Deer Park refinery near Houston, Texas for about $600 million. The two refineries would have similar capacities, leading to questions about the much larger investment in building a new refinery. López Obrador says he wants to make Mexico self-sufficient in gasoline, which it has long imported.

AP

Amazon is barring off-duty warehouse workers from the company’s facilities. Under the policy, employees are barred from accessing buildings or other working areas on their scheduled days off, and before or after their shifts. Amazon says the policy does not prohibit off-duty employees from engaging co-workers in “non-working areas” outside company’s buildings. It also says the policy will not be enforced discriminatorily against employees seeking to unionize. But organizers say the new rule will hinder union drives. Amazon had previously barred employee access to non-working areas beyond 15 minutes before or after their shifts. It rescinded that policy when it entered a settlement with federal labor officials in December.

AP

Police say a 1-year-old infant has died in North Carolina after being left inside a hot car by the father after he went to work. Police in the community of Mebane told local media outlets officers got a call shortly after midday Friday about a child in a car at a manufacturing plant. Police say that when the officers arrived, CPR was being administered, but the child couldn’t be revived. Police say the child’s father worked at the plant and had left the baby in the vehicle. Investigators have not determined how long the child was in the car.

AP

A federal judge has ruled Arizona has been violating the constitutional rights of incarcerated people in state-run prisons by providing them with inadequate medical and mental health care. Judge Roslyn Silver said the problems stem largely from not having enough health employees to care for the roughly 25,000 incarcerated people housed in state-run prisons. She said corrections officials have made no significant attempts to fix the understaffing problem. Silver said Corrections Director David Shinn’s claim that prisoners often have greater access to health service than people who aren’t locked up was “completely detached from reality.” Shinn’s office had no immediate comment on the ruling.