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Renowned comic actress Kirstie Alley, who starred in “Cheers,” “Drop Dead Gorgeous” and “Look Who’s Talking,” died of cancer on Monday. She was 71.

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North Korea’s military says it has ordered frontline units to conduct artillery firings into the sea for the second consecutive day in a tit-for-tat response to South Korean live-fire drills in an inland border region. The statement by the North Korean People’s Army’s General Staff on Tuesday came a day after the North fired about 130 artillery rounds into waters near its western and eastern sea boundaries with South Korea. It's the latest military action raising tensions between the rivals. An unidentified North Korean military spokesperson said the planned artillery firings Tuesday were meant as a warning to the South after the North detected signs of South Korean artillery exercises in the border region.

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The U.S. Senate has confirmed the appointment of a federal magistrate from southern Indiana to the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. The Senate voted 60-31 Monday to confirmed Doris L. Pryor. Since March 2018, Pryor has served as magistrate judge for the Southern District of Indiana. Before that, she served as an assistant U.S. attorney for the Southern District of Indiana. Republican Sen. Todd Young of Indiana says Pryor “is a public servant of the highest caliber.” She will be the first Black from Indiana ever to serve on the 7th Circuit, which covers Indiana, Illinois and Wisconsin.

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Kirstie Alley, a two-time Emmy winner who starred in the 1980s sitcom “Cheers” and the hit film “Look Who’s Talking,” has died. She was 71. Her death was announced Monday by her children on social media and confirmed by her manager. The post said their mother died of cancer that was recently diagnosed. She starred as Rebecca Howe on the NBC sitcom “Cheers” from 1987 to 1993, after the departure of original star Shelley Long. She had her own sitcom on the network, “Veronica’s Closet,” from 1997 to 2000.

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Antisemitic hate crimes in NYC are on the rise, NYPD figures show

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DETROIT — A life prison sentence for Adam Fox, a convicted ringleader of a plot to kidnap Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, is sufficient for trying to "light the fire of a second revolution," federal prosecutors said late Monday.

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The Canadian branch of Amnesty International says it was the target of a cyber attack sponsored by China.  The human rights organization says it first detected the breach on Oct. 5 and hired forensic investigators and cyber security experts to investigate.  It says cybersecurity firm Secureworks said “a threat group sponsored or tasked by the Chinese state” was likely behind the attack. The searches in their systems were specifically and solely related to China and Hong Kong, as well as a few prominent Chinese activists

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Federal prosecutors say a life prison sentence would be justified for the leader of a plot to kidnap Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer. The government filed a sentencing memo Monday in Grand Rapids, a week before Adam Fox faces a judge.  Prosecutors say his goal to turn the country upside down in 2020 with a kidnapping was a forerunner of rampant anti-government extremism. Judge Robert Jonker will have much flexibility in punishing Fox. But the government notes that his sentencing score is “off the chart,” greatly enhanced by his conviction for conspiring to use a weapon of mass destruction in the scheme. The FBI broke up the plan with arrests in October 2020.

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The major freight railroads now face pressure from investors to add sick days after Congress declined to require them as part of the contracts they imposed last week to avert a potentially devastating nationwide rail strike. The Interfaith Center on Corporate Responsibility said Monday that two investment managers it works with filed proposals at Union Pacific and Norfolk Southern railroads to allow shareholders to vote on whether rail workers should get paid sick leave. Similar proposals are likely at CSX and at BNSF’s parent company of Berkshire Hathaway. The lack of paid sick time in the industry became a major sticking point this fall in contract talks between the railroads and their 12 unions.

AP

Mexico's troubled Maya Train tourist project will now include a 50-mile (78 kilometer) stretch of elevated trackway through the jungle. President Andrés Manuel López Obrador has changed his mind a number of times on pet project, which is intended to ferry tourists around the Yucatan peninsula. The project has faced opposition from environmentalists who say the train will crush or contaminate the network of caves and sinkhole lakes around the resorts of Tulum and Playa del Carmen. And engineers worried the fragile, cave-ridden limestone soil will collapse under the weight of the high-speed train. But the president now says two-thirds of the line won't touch the ground.

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Cuban officials have announced that women boxers will be able to compete officially after decades of restrictions. The news sparked excitement in women boxers who have spent years fighting to be recognized. “I have a new hope for life, because my life has changed. From now on, I’m going to focus solely on boxing,” said 22-year-old boxer Giselle Bello Garcia. Cuba is known worldwide for boxing, home to many legendary male boxers and owner of a dozens of Olympic medals in the sport. But the island has also sparked controversy by not allowing women to compete.

AP

The first attempt to survey the extent of violence and harassment at work around the globe has found that workplace abuse is widespread, and particularly pronounced among young people, migrants, and wage earners, especially women. More than 22% of the nearly 75,000 workers in 121 countries surveyed last year reported having experienced at least one type of violence or harassment, according to the report released Monday by the U.N. International Labor Organization, the Lloyds Register Foundation and Gallup. It said: “Violence and harassment in the world of work is a pervasive and harmful phenomenon, with profound and costly effects.”

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The manager appointed by the U.S. Justice Department to oversee reforms to the beleaguered water system in Mississippi’s capital city says he hopes to wrap up work in one year or less. Ted Henifin's intended time frame echoes the Justice Department’s order appointing him as interim manager in Jackson. Henifin has been tasked with implementing 13 projects to improve the water system’s near-term stability. His work is meant to be an interim step while city, state and federal officials negotiate a court-enforced decree to mandate improvements. Jackson Mayor Chokwe Antar Lumumba says the city’s work with the federal government to improve the water system could take longer than one year.

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Five men were have been gunned down in a bar in Mexico's Pacific coast resort of Acapulco. Prosecutors said the attack occurred Monday. Three of the men died inside the bar, and two outside or at a hospital. Three other people were shot to death at another point in Acapulco in an unrelated attack. Acapulco's reputation has suffered for years under a wave of violent crime. No longer popular among international tourists, Acapulco remains a main get-away for Mexico City residents. But even that market took a hit over the weekend, when there were reports of robbery attempts on the main highway linking the resort to the capital.

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Former U.S. Education Secretary John King Jr. has been named chancellor of the State University of New York, the nation's largest university system. The appointment announced Monday marks a return to New York for King, who was once the state's education commissioner. King is scheduled to begin in January at a salary of a $750,000. King served as President Barack Obama’s education secretary in the last year of his presidency.  He ran for governor of Maryland earlier this year, losing in the Democratic primary. As New York’s first Black and Puerto Rican education commissioner, King was at the helm during the contentious rollout of the Common Core academic standards.

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Honduras has become the second country in Central America to impose a state of exception suspending some constitutional rights to deal with street gangs. A decree took effect Monday that targets the capital Tegucigalpa and the northern business hub of San Pedro Sula, which have both struggled under the sway of powerful gangs like Barrio 18 and MS-13. Published Monday, the measures will last one month, but lawmakers will have the ability to extend them, something that has happened repeatedly in El Salvador since a state of exception was imposed in March. The Honduran measures affect constitutional rights of association, free movement, searches and arrests.

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Oklahoma prosecutors have filed first-degree murder charges against a 67-year-old man accused of killing and dismembering four men whose bodies were found in a river. Okmulgee County District Attorney Carol Iski said four counts of murder were filed Friday against Joseph Kennedy. Iski says video and cellphone evidence places Kennedy at his scrap yard where authorities believe the four men were killed and at a bridge near where the bodies were found. Court documents released last week indicate Kennedy admitted to a woman that he killed and dismembered the men because they were stealing from him. Kennedy is being held without bond in the Okmulgee County Detention Center. His court-appointed attorneys have declined to comment on the case.

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MIAMI — A gunman shot at and injured a county robbery detective during an undercover surveillance in Northwest Miami-Dade, authorities said, the latest in a series of attacks against law enforcement officers in recent months.

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Bulgaria has rejected accusations that its border guards shot a Syrian refugee in October. Interior Minister Ivan Demerdzhiev said, “There are no cases of violence against migrants.” He spoke after a video released Monday showed a man being fired at on European country’s border with Turkey. The footage of an asylum-seeker being hit with live ammunition on Oct. 3 was part of a joint investigation by several European media outlets led by Lighthouse Reports. In the video recorded on the Turkish side of the border, a young man falls to the ground after a bullet goes through his hand and into his chest.

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Much of the Arctic is in a burst of freak December warming. Temperatures in Alaska’s northernmost community hit 40 degrees Monday morning. That’s not only a record by six degrees but it’s the warmest that region has seen on record from late October to late April. Greenland a couple days ago hit 54 degrees, which is shirtsleeve weather. Scientists say some of it is random weather from storms and some of it is from low sea ice. The low sea ice is due to climate change. Open water acts as a heating pad in the Arctic in the winter.

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The Minnesota Board of Pharmacy is suing a Moorhead-based manufacturer of THC-laced gummies, saying the company’s candies contain far stronger doses of the chemical that gives marijuana its high than state law allows. The lawsuit filed Monday alleges that Northland Vapor and its stores in Moorhead and Bemidji are violating Minnesota’s new law allowing low-potency edible and drinkable cannabinoids. It alleges investigators found candies with 20 times the legal dose and packages containing 50 times the limit. The board says it has embargoed the products, which it says have a retail value of over $7 million

AP

A former Miami Republican congressman who signed a $50 million consulting contract with Venezuela’s socialist government has been arrested in connection to an ongoing federal criminal investigation. The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Miami said David Rivera was arrested Monday in Atlanta. A spokesperson said Rivera was indicted by a Miami grand jury last month, but that document remains sealed and she could not discuss the charges. Rivera had an initial appearance Monday in Atlanta federal court. The U.S. Marshal’s Service said he bailed out of jail Monday afternoon. An attorney for Rivera, Jeffrey Feldman, declined to comment, telling The Associated Press in a text message that he had “not seen the indictment.”

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ATLANTA — Conservative North Georgia talk show host Brian K. Pritchard, a candidate for the state House who rails against election fraud, allegedly voted illegally nine times while serving a felony sentence in a $33,000 forgery and theft case, state officials say.

AP

The World Cup stadium was designed to leave a minimal footprint in the Qatari sand. It’s now due to be dismantled. Stadium 974 played host to seven matches. The one one was Brazil’s 4-1 win over South Korea in the last 16 on Monday. Qatar says the stadium will disappear. But it isn’t clear when that will happen. The country will soon stage an Asian Cup, the multi-sport Asian Games and maybe even a Summer Olympics. The big question is what happens next for Qatar's venues after the World Cup ends.

AP

Prosecutors in northern Mexico have blamed private hospitals for contaminated anesthetics that caused a meningitis outbreak that has killed 22 people and sickened at least 71. Prosecutors in Durango state said Monday they have issued seven arrest warrants for the owners or directors of four private hospitals where the outbreak occurred starting in October.  Almost all of those infected were women undergoing obstetric procedures, and received a type of anesthesia known as a spinal block. The shots were contaminated with a fungus. Some had worried the medication itself had been contaminated in the manufacturing or distribution process, but authorities said the problem arose at the hospitals.

AP

North Carolina state Rep. Robert Reives of Chatham County has been chosen to remain the party’s state House leader for the next two years. New and returning Democrats who won their House elections last month met on Monday and selected Reives as the chamber’s minority leader. Reives first became Democratic leader two years ago, succeeding then-Rep. Darren Jackson of Wake County. Democrats will hold just 49 of the 120 House seats come January — two fewer compared to the past session. But Republicans are still one seat short of a veto-proof majority. Other House Democratic leadership positions will be elected in the coming weeks.

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Canada unveiled a fresh round of sanctions against members of Haiti’s economic elite on Monday, accusing three high-profile individuals of aiding armed gangs that have thrown the country into turmoil.

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Congo's government now says at least 270 people died in a massacre last week in the country's east it blamed on M23 rebels. But the rebel's chairman is disputing the figure and accusing the government of using false information given by a local tribal militia leader. It was not immediately possible to corroborate the death toll given Monday because of insecurity in the area. The village of Kishishe is located only 70 kilometers (43 miles) from the regional capital of Goma. The Congolese government initially said that 50 people had died last Tuesday. Government spokesman Patrick Muyaya says that an official investigation is being opened into the killings that took place in Kishishe.

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A special grand jury has issued a scathing report against a northern Virginia school system for mishandling a student who sexually assaulted classmates at two different high schools last year. Virginia Gov. Glenn Youngkin requested the investigation of Loudoun County Public Schools on his first day in office. He had criticized the school system during his campaign for putting social justice initiatives above student safety. The report, issued Monday, found that administrators had ample warning of the student's potentially dangerous behavior before the assaults. A school system spokesman said a response to the report would be issued later Monday.

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The Mall of America in suburban Minneapolis says it will toughen its trespassing policies as part of a settlement with the family of a boy who was severely injured when a man with a history of causing disturbances at the mall threw him from a third-floor balcony. Additional details of the settlement announced Monday were not released. The boy, identified only as Landen, was 5 when Emmanuel Aranda threw him nearly 40 feet to the ground. Aranda had been banned from the mall twice in previous years. He pleaded guilty in the attack. The family had sued the mall saying it should have prevented Aranda from “prowling” there without being closely followed.

AP

Texas’ top elections official has resigned. Secretary of State John Scott said Monday he would step down after an intense year of trying to reassure election skeptics, navigating the rocky launch of new voting laws and overseeing a limited audit of the 2020 election. The Republican came under immediate scrutiny from the moment he took the job in October 2021. He was briefly part of former President Donald Trump’s legal team that challenged the results of the 2020 election. But he said upon taking the job in Texas that he did not dispute that President Joe Biden was the winner. His successor will be chosen by Abbott, who was reelected to a third term in November.

AP

Election officials say they found no problems with vote-counting machines in Minnesota when they conducted hand counts to verify that the machines accurately reflected how people voted. Minnesota requires all counties to hand-count ballots in a few randomly chosen precincts. During the hand count, election judges make sure their tallies match those recorded by vote-tabulating machines on Election Day. David Maeda, director of elections for the secretary of state’s office, tells Minnesota Public Radio they did not find any significant issues. Some counties decided to count more precincts or races than required after residents and activists raised questions about accuracy.

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The United States and European Union have agreed to intensify talks to resolve EU concerns over major subsidies for American companies contained in a U.S. clean energy law. Although no deal was reached at talks Monday, the two sides pledged to continue work and push for a solution that benefits both U.S. and European firms, workers and consumers. The U.S. Inflation Reduction Act offers about $375 billion in new and extended tax credits to help the the U.S. clean energy industry as well as buyers of qualifying electric vehicles made in North America. But European leaders have expressed alarm that the subsidies would be an enormous setback for European companies.

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Incarcerated lawyer Michael Avenatti has been sentenced in Southern California to 14 years in federal prison for cheating his clients out of millions of dollars. The judge on Monday also ordered him to pay $7 million in restitution. Avenatti had pleaded guilty to four counts of wire fraud and a tax-related charge.  He was accused of negotiating and collecting settlement payments on behalf of his clients and instead funneling the money to accounts he controlled. The judged said the sentence should run consecutively to the five-year prison term he is currently serving for separate convictions in New York

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A southern Minnesota school district is expected to vote Monday on a $1.1 million state grant meant to help curb drug use among students of color. Two board members had delayed accepting the money by arguing it could discriminate against white students. The Minneapolis Star Tribune reports at least five members of the seven-person Faribault school board say they will vote in favor of accepting the funding when it comes to a vote Monday evening. In November, four of the board’s members were deadlocked in a vote over the funding after two members argued that programs specifically for students of color was unfair to white students.

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Experts have identified the remains of a soldier from Massachusetts who died in a Japanese prisoner of war camp in the the Philippines during World War II. The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency said Monday that Army Pfc. Arthur L. Pierce, of Malden, was accounted for in July through mitochondrial DNA analysis as well as anthropological analysis and circumstantial evidence. The 26-year-old Pierce was captured in 1942, endured the Bataan Death March, and died in the Cabanatuan camp. Pierce will be buried in Augusta, Maine, at a future date.

AP

The final day of the round of 16 concludes Tuesday at the World Cup when Morocco faces Spain and Portugal goes head-to-head with Switzerland for the final two spots on the quarterfinals. Morocco is trying to secure its first appearance in the quarterfinals. The Atlas Lions topped Group F to reach the knockout round for the first time since 1986. The neighboring nations met in the teams’ final group game in 2018, which ended 2-2. Portugal heads into its match against Switzerland with all eyes on Cristiano Ronaldo. He's rumored to be about to join a Saudi Arabian team. A poll in Portugal said most in his home nation don't want him playing for the team. And Ronaldo angered his coach with bad body language when he was pulled from a loss against South Korea.

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The German chemical company BASF will restore damaged natural resources at a notorious Superfund site in New Jersey where decades or pollution and illegal dumping caused vast contamination of the environment. The state Department of Environmental Protection says it has a deal with BASF to restore conditions at the former Ciba Geigy plant in Toms River. BASF, based in Ludwigshafen, Germany, is the corporate successor to Ciba Geigy. Cleanup efforts have been ongoing for decades at the site and will continue, even as the environmental restoration work proceeds. Work is expected to begin in the spring and last for five years.

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German police say a 14-year-old girl died and a 13-year-old girl was seriously injured after they were attacked by a man with a knife on their way to school. Police in the southwestern city of Ulm said the older girl was resuscitated before being rushed to a hospital following the attack in the town of Illerkirchberg. They say she died there later Monday “despite all efforts by the doctors." The younger girl remains hospitalized with serious but not life-threatening injuries. A 27-year-old man was arrested inside a refugee shelter near the scene of the attack. Police say he he had injuries and a knife. Two other men were also detained.

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The Environmental Protection Agency has ordered the removal of thousands of pounds of chemicals from an oil refinery in the U.S. Virgin Islands. The agency anhydrous ammonia, hydrogen sulfide and liquified petroleum gas must be removed from the refinery in St. Croix, where pipes and valves are severely corroded and in disrepair. The refinery jointly owned by the U.S.-based Hess Corporation and Venezuela's state-owned oil company was the largest in the Western Hemisphere at one point. But it lost money and was sold off. The EPA suspended its operations last year. The current owners did not return a message seeking comment on Monday's removal order.

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A Minnesota town has backed away from a proposal to let people sue abortion providers, including organizations that provide abortion drugs by mail, after the state attorney general warned that the plan was unconstitutional. But the legislator behind the proposal, which is based on a Texas law, said Monday he’s not giving up despite the unanimous vote by the Prinsburg City Council on Friday to drop the idea. Republican Tim Miller, of Prinsburg, says he still thinks it's constitutional despite what Democratic Attorney General Keith Ellison says. Miller said he'll continue trying to enact it in other rural Minnesota communities.

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The Port of Savannah plans a $410 million overhaul of one of its sprawling terminals to make room for loading and unloading larger ships. The Georgia Ports Authority board approved the project Monday under a plan to expand Savannah's capacity for cargo containers by more than 50% by 2025. It means major changes for the port's Ocean Terminal, which currently handles most of Georgia's breakbulk cargo such as lumber, paper and steel. Those operations will move over the coming year to the nearby Port of Brunswick. Ocean Terminal will be upgraded with new berths and eight ship-to-shore cranes, allowing the complex to focus almost exclusively on cargo shipped in containers.

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An outbreak of bird flu in pelicans has spread from Peru and Ecuador to Venezuela. Now authorities are taking emergency efforts to protect the Venezuela's poultry industry. Numerous pelicans were found dead over the weekend, on beaches and waterfronts, mangrove forests and up in the trees in the northwest state of Anzoátegui. Tests turned up positive cases of bird flu. To contain the outbreak, a quarantine has been imposed in five states. It prohibits moving live birds and eggs and requires entire flocks to be sacrificed. Live chickens are already hard to find in markets in Caracas, just as families make plans for traditional Christmas meals.

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Police say a suburban Chicago man killed his wife, two young children and mother inside their home last week before fatally stabbing himself. Police officers found the two girls and three adults dead Wednesday at the home in the Lake County village of Buffalo Grove. They were conducting a check because the girls’ mother didn’t arrive for work. Buffalo Grove Police Chief Brian Budds said Monday that evidence indicates 39-year-old Andrei Kisliak killed the others then himself. Police identified the other victims as 4-year-old Amilia Kisliak; 6-year-old Vivian Kisliak; 36-year-old Vera Kisliak; and 67-year-old Lilia Kisliak. Autopsies determined they all died from “sharp force injuries."

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A federal prosecutor says a wealthy Maryland businessman bought the run-down home of Harvard’s fencing coach for well above its value, bankrolled the renovation of his $1 million condo and helped pay the coach’s bills in a scheme to secure coveted spots for his sons at the elite university. Assistant U.S. Attorney Ian Stearns told jurors in his opening statement Monday that Peter Brand “gave into corruption” to accept more than $1.5 million in bribes from Jie “Jack” Zhao in exchange for recruiting Zhao's two sons to the fencing team. Defense attorneys say the payments were loans between good friends and not bribes.

AP

Just five months before the latest Real ID deadline, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security has again extended when travelers will need to have a federally mandated identification card for domestic flights.